HCV and HIV coinfection

HCV infection is common in people with HIV. In fact, about 25% of people with HIV in the United States are also infected with HCV, and about 80% of people with HIV who inject drugs also have HCV.1 HCV and HIV coinfection can lead to serious medical complications, and for this reason, screening for HCV infection is imperative among HIV-infected persons.2

 
For more information, watch the webinar Evaluation and Management of HIV/HCV Coinfection
 

Important facts about HCV/HIV coinfection:

  • Hepatitis C progresses faster among people who also have HIV infection.1
  • HCV/HIV coinfection more than triples the risk for liver disease, liver failure, and liver-related death from HCV.1
  • HCV infection may also impact the course and management of HIV infection.1
  • While there is no vaccine for HCV, treatments are available and they are continually improving, with fewer side effects and shorter treatment duration than in the past.

Annual screening for HCV infection is imperative among HIV-infected persons and highly recommended by the CDC, AASLD, and US Public Health Service/IDSA guidelines.2,3

AASLD=American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases; CDC=Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; IDSA=Infectious Diseases Society of America.

References: 1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV and viral hepatitis. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/library_factsheets_hiv_and_viral_hepatitis.pdf. Accessed April 24, 2017. 2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis. https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/populations/hiv.htm. Accessed April 24, 2017. 3. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, Infectious Diseases Society of America. Recommendations for testing, managing, and treating hepatitis C. http://www.hcvguidelines.org/sites/default/files/HCV-Guidance_April_2017_a.pdf. Accessed April 24, 2017.