Noninvasive prenatal screening Q&A

Woman with green trees in backgroundGet your questions answered about noninvasive testing with QNatal® Advanced. Don't see the question you have in mind? Don't let important questions go unanswered. Your obstetrician will be glad to help.

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  • What conditions can QNatal® Advanced screening detect?

    QNatal® Advanced can detect the following non-inherited conditions: 

    • Down syndrome (also called trisomy 21)
    • Edwards syndrome (also called trisomy 18)
    • Patau syndrome (also called trisomy 13)
    • Turner syndrome (also called monosomy X)
    • Klinefelter syndrome (also called XXY)
    • Triple X and XYY syndromes

    Other conditions can be detected too, but they are much rarer. The test can also tell you if your unborn baby is male or female. 

  • Why would my doctor order this test?

    Most often, QNatal® Advanced is ordered for pregnant women who are considered high risk and have a higher chance of having a baby with one of these conditions. They include women who:

    • Are 35 years or older at time of delivery
    • Have had an abnormal ultrasound
    • Have had a previous pregnancy with, or a family history of, one of these conditions
    • Have a positive maternal serum screening test

    Your doctor may also recommend this screening as a choice for you to consider for an early, highly accurate, reliable result as noninvasive prenatal screening provides greater accuracy than traditional maternal serum screening.

    The test can be used for women who are carrying more than one fetus (e.g., twins or triplets). The test cannot tell which fetus is affected. Women who used another woman’s egg to get pregnant can also be tested.
     

  • How early in my pregnancy can I have the QNatal Advanced
    screening test?

    As early as 10 weeks.

  • How is the test performed?

    The test is performed on a blood sample taken from your arm. Two tubes of your blood will be collected at your healthcare provider’s office or at a Quest Diagnostics Patient Service Center. The blood will be sent to the laboratory for testing. Once the test is complete, results will be sent back to your healthcare provider.

  • How accurate is QNatal® Advanced?

    The test is very accurate and uses advanced DNA sequencing technology to identify chromosome numbers. This test can also determine the gender of your baby. Since no test is perfect—a negative result does not guarantee the birth of a healthy baby—your doctor may want to follow up a positive result with another test.

  • What is trisomy 21—often called Down syndrome?

    Down syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome number 21. Babies with Down syndrome have a distinct physical appearance and mild to moderate intellectual disability. They also have an increased chance of other health problems, such as heart defects. About 1 in every 800 babies is born with Down syndrome.

    Download an electronic book on Down Syndrome

    Find more resources and information

  • What is trisomy 18—often called Edwards syndrome?

    Edwards syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome number 18. Babies with trisomy 18 have severe intellectual disabilities. They often have other birth defects as well. Ninety percent of babies with trisomy 18 don’t survive past the first few years of life. About 1 in every 6,000 babies is born with trisomy 18.

    Find more resources and information

  • What is trisomy 13—often called Patau syndrome?

    Patau syndrome is caused by an extra copy of chromosome number 13. It is similar to Edwards syndrome in the amount and severity of birth defects. About 1 in every 7,000 to 1 in every 33,000 babies is born with trisomy 13.

    Find more resources and information

  • What is monosomy X—often called Turner syndrome?

    Turner syndrome is caused by loss of an X chromosome and occurs only in girls. Girls with Turner syndrome are usually shorter than average. Some have other birth defects. Most cannot have babies of their own when they grow up. About 1 in every 2,500 girls is born with monosomy X.

    Find more resources and information

  • What is XXY—often called Klinefelter syndrome?

    Klinefelter syndrome (XXY) is caused by two X chromosomes and one Y and occurs only in boys. Boys with this syndrome are usually taller than average. Some have other birth defects. Many cannot father children of their own when they grow up. As many as 1 in 500 boys is born with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Find more resources and information

  • What are triple X and XYY syndromes?

    Triple X and XYY syndromes are both caused by an extra chromosome. Children are usually taller than average. They may have learning or behavioral problems. About 1 in every 1,000 girls is born with triple X syndrome and about 1 in every 1,000 boys is born with XYY syndrome.

    Find more resources and information